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Volume 59, issue 1
Arch. Anim. Breed., 59, 59-64, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-59-59-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Arch. Anim. Breed., 59, 59-64, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/aab-59-59-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Original study 27 Jan 2016

Original study | 27 Jan 2016

Genetic diversity of domesticated and wild Sudanese guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) based on microsatellite markers

C. Weimann1, N. M. Eltayeb1,2, H. Brandt1, I. A.-S. Yousif3, M. M. Abdel Hamid4, and G. Erhardt1 C. Weimann et al.
  • 1Institute of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Justus Liebig University, Gießen, Germany
  • 2Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, College of Animal Production, University of Bahri, Khartoum, Sudan
  • 3Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Faculty of Animal Production, University of Khartoum, Sudan
  • 4Department of Parasitology and Medical Entomology, Institute of Endemic Diseases, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan

Abstract. Genetic diversity was investigated among four Sudanese domesticated guinea fowl populations collected in different regions of Sudan: the states of Blue Nile (BL), Gezira and Khartoum (G), Kassala and Gedaref (KG), and West and North Kordofan (N). In addition, one wild population from Dinder National Park (D) was included. From 25 microsatellites chosen, 10 were informative and used for the current study. A total of 107 alleles were found with observed heterozygosity between 0.364 and 0.494. The populations kept on farms showed high genetic identity with values between 0.9269 and 0.9601. Neighbor-joining tree analysis and STRUCTURE modeling showed that the wild population clearly differs from the populations kept on farms.

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